Environmental Sciences Ph.D. Program

The Wayne Carmichael Lecture in Environmental Sciences

The annual lecture is named in honor of Wayne Carmichael, Ph.D., professor emeritus in biological sciences and the first director of Wright State’s Environmental Sciences Ph.D. program.

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2016

"The Past, Present and Future of Food and Agriculture"
Dr. Casey Hoy, Ohio State University

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Download video recorded lecture (.mp4)

Gandhi Auditorium, White Hall
Wright State University
Reception (in lobby) at 5 p.m.
Lecture at 6 p.m.

“Our present food and agricultural system is characterized by sophisticated management of miraculous technology, unsustainable resource use, and inequitable benefits that leave about 1 in 7 of our Ohio neighbors regularly experiencing low food security. Our future challenges, heightened by climate change impacts that are already beginning, mean a transformation in food and agriculture is needed, and it may already have begun. Lets talk about the principles of transformation that will maintain healthy agroecosystems and secure good food for all”

Biography:  Casey Hoy joined The Ohio State University as an Assistant Professor of Entomology upon completion of his graduate work at Cornell University in 1987, and was promoted to Associate Professor in 1993, and Professor in 1998.  The former Associate Chairman of the Department of Entomology, he has held the Kellogg Endowed Chair in Agricultural Ecosystems Management and provided leadership to the Agroecosystems Management Program of the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center since 2006.  Prof. Hoy’s past research has included systems analysis and its application to integrated pest management and applied ecology.  His current work provides interdisciplinary leadership toward advancements in agroecosystem health and sustainable communities. He currently leads the Ohio State University Discovery Themes Initiative for Food and AgriCultural Transformation, InFACT, an investment of approximately $100 million over the next 10 years in resilient and sustainable food security, including 30 new faculty hires across the University.  Prof. Hoy teaches graduate level courses that include systems analysis and quantitative methods in environmental research.  He has received the OARDC Multidisciplinary Team Research Award, OARDC Distinguished Faculty Research Award, and the ESA Award for Excellence in Integrated Pest Management.  He has served on many federal grant review panels, the Ohio Food Policy Advisory Council, several boards of trustees and the executive committee for the Kellogg endowed Inter-institutional Network for Food and Agricultural Sustainability.  

Sponsored by The Environmental Sciences Ph.D. Program, The Department of Biological Sciences, The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Pi Epsilon, the College of Science and Mathematics and the Graduate School.

Reception Sponsored by Propolis Projects/Levin Family Foundation

Call (937) 775-3273 for more information.


2015

"How Harmful are Harmful Algae Blooms?"
Dr. Wayne Carmichael, Professor Emeritus, Wright State University

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Gandhi Auditorium, White Hall
Wright State University
Reception (in lobby) at 5 p.m.
Lecture at 6 p.m.

Professor Emeritus Wayne Carmichael has investigated and carried out primary research on toxin producing cyanobacteria for over 40 years. He has over 500 scientific peer reviewed papers, presentations and invited seminars on the topic. He has worked and advised on cyanobacteria and their toxins in over 25 countries and almost every state and province in North America. Projects as a Professor Emeritus focus on management and mitigation of harmful cyanobacteria in municipal and recreational water supplies. This includes serving on national and international HAB committees, organization of and participation in workshops and symposia plus advising on HAB issues for local, state, national and international agencies and groups.

Sponsored by The Environmental Sciences PhD Program, The Department of Biological Sciences, The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The Society of Sigma Xi, Pi Epsilon the National Environmental Sciences Honor Society, The College of Science and Mathematics and The Graduate School.

Call (937) 775-3273 for more information.


2014

"Food Webs in River Networks"
Dr. Mary Power, University of California-Berkeley

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Gandhi Auditorium, White Hall
Wright State University
Reception (in lobby) at 5 p.m.
Lecture at 6 p.m.

Dr. Mary Power received a B.A. from Brown University, an M.S. from Boston University’s Marine Program, and a PhD from the University of Washington. Her research interests center on how attributes of species affect food web struc-ture and dynamics, and how strengths of these interactions change under different environmental regimes. She has studied, for example, the interplay of trophic dynamics with hydrologic and productivity regimes in northern Califor-nia rivers, as well as impacts of invading alien species, and linkages between rivers and their watersheds. Much of her work has been conducted at the Angelo Coast Range Reserve, a field station that she directs for the University of California Natural Reserve System. Among her many honors and awards, Dr. Power has been a Guggenheim Fellow, has served as president of numerous research societies and on the Board of Editors of Science magazine, and is an elected fellow of the California Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Sciences.

Sponsored by The Environmental Sciences PhD Program, The Department of Biological Sciences, The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The Society of Sigma Xi and the College of Science and Mathematics.

Call (937) 775-3273 for more information.


2013

"Diversity and Distribution of Avian Malaria Parasites: A Model System for Pathogen-Host Interactions"
Dr. Robert Ricklefs, University of Missouri-St. Louis

Monday, March 18, 2013

Gandhi Auditorium, White Hall
Wright State University
Reception (in lobby) at 5 p.m.
Lecture at 6 p.m.

Dr. Robert Ricklefs is the Curators' Professor of Biology at the University of Missouri, St. Louis. He graduated with a B.S. from Stanford University in 1963 and a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1967. He did postdoctoral research at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute before taking a faculty position at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the recipient of numerous awards for his ornithological research and leadership in the field of ecology, including the American Ornithologists' Union 's William Brewster Memorial Award, the Pacific Seabird Group 's Lifetime Achievement Award., the Margaret Morse Nice Medal by the Wilson Ornithological Society, and the Cooper Ornithological Society’s Loye and Alden Miller Research Award. He has made major contributions to island biogeography theory, and has made major conceptual advances in the field of community ecology in general. His popular textbook Ecology was first published in 1973. Among his many other awards and honors, Dr. Ricklefs was inducted into the National Academy of Sciences in 2009.

Sponsored by The Environmental Sciences Ph.D. Program, The Department of Biological Sciences, The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The Society of Sigma Xi, and the College of Science and Mathematics.

Call (937) 775-3273 for more information.


2012

"How Climate Works and What it Means for the Future"
Dr. Chris Poulsen, University of Michigan

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Gandhi Auditorium, White Hall
Wright State University
Reception (in lobby) at 5 p.m.
Lecture at 6 p.m.

Dr. Chris Poulsen delivered the third annual Wayne Carmichael Lecture in Environmental Sciences to a full house on Tuesday May 15. Dr. Poulsen, a climate scientist from the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Michigan, gave a talk entitled “How Climate Works and What it Means for the Future”.


2011

"Science and Policy of Biological Invasions: From Kudzu to Carp"
Dr. David Lodge, University of Notre Dame

Thursday, May 19, 2011

Gandhi Auditorium, White Hall
Wright State University
Reception at 5 p.m.
Lecture at 6 p.m.

David M. Lodge is a Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, Director of the Center for Aquatic Conservation, and Director of the new Environmental Change Initiative at the University of Notre Dame. Lodge is a freshwater ecologist whose research focuses on eco- system services and ecological forecasting to better inform environmental risk analysis, bio- economics, policy, and management. Lodge completed his D.Phil. at Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, is an Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow, and was the first chair of the US national Invasive Species Advisory Committee. Lodge’s research, published in over 150 scientific papers, has been featured in many videos, TV news including NBC Nightly News and Nightline, radio shows including NPR’s All Things Considered, magazine articles including the New Yorker, and newspapers including The New York Times. He has frequently provided testimony on invasive species to US congressional committees.

Lodge Lab
Center for Aquatic Conservation

Sponsored by The Environmental Sciences Ph.D. Program, The Department of Biological Sciences, The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The Society of Sigma Xi, and the College of Science and Mathematics.

Call (937) 775-3273 for more information.


2010

"Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations"
Dr. David Montgomery, University of Washington

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Gandhi Auditorium, White Hall
Wright State University
Reception at 5 p.m.
Lecture at 6 p.m.

Macarthur Fellow David R. Montgomery studies geomorphology, the evolution of landscapes. He graduated from Stanford University in 1984 with a B.S. in geology and from U.C. Berkeley in 1991 with a Ph.D. in geomorphology. He is a professor in the Department of Earth & Space Sciences at the University of Washington. His research interests range from the co-evolution of the Pacific salmon and the topography of the Pacific Northwest to the environmental history of Puget Sound rivers, interactions among climate, tec-tonics, and erosion in shaping mountain ranges, and giant glacial floods in eastern Tibet. He is the author of Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations and King of Fish: The Thousand-Year Run of Salmon.

Sponsored by The Environmental Sciences Ph.D. Program, The Tecumseh Land Trust, The Department of Biological Sciences, The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The Society of Sigma Xi, and the College of Science and Mathematics.

Call (937) 775-3273 for more information.