Department of Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology (NCBP)

Welcome to the Wright State University Department of Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology.  

We are dedicated to sustaining excellence in basic, translational, and clinical research, and in providing the best in undergraduate, graduate, medical education.

NCBP research in Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology has thematic interests in cellular signaling processes associated with human health and disease. 

NCBP faculty are funded through agencies that include the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, the Office of Naval Research, the American Heart Association, the Muscular Dystrophy Association, and other national or international funding agencies. Investigators are supported by state-of-the-art infrastructure including access to core laboratories in imaging, small animal physiology, behavior, genomics, and proteomics.

The B.S. in Neuroscience, M.S. in Anatomy, and M.S. in Physiology & Neuroscience degree programs provide an interactive educational experience designed to prepare graduates for careers in the biomedical sciences.  NCBP faculty are also active in the education, training, and mentoring of Ph.D. students in the Biomedical Sciences (BMS) Ph.D. program and are integral to medical student education  at the Boonshoft School of Medicine.

Areas of Research

Neuroscience

  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  • Blood brain barrier regulation
  • Brain-machine interface
  • Control of breathing
  • Motor neuron disease
  • Movement disorders
  • Nerve conduction disorders
  • Neural circuits
  • Neurodevelopment
  • Neuromuscular diseases
  • Neuro-rehabilitation
  • Pain
  • Peripheral nervous system
  • Prosthetic control
  • Stroke
  • Synaptic Plasticity

Cell Biology

  • Biodefense
  • Biosafety
  • Cancer
  • Gene therapy/transfer
  • Glycans in health and disease
  • Host defense mechanisms
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Intracellular signaling networks
  • Immune system
  • Metabolic disorders
  • Nanotechnology
  • Pregnancy associated disorders
  • Viruses and viral vectors

Physiology

  • Arrhythmias
  • Blood pressure regulation
  • Cardiomyopathy and Heart Failure
  • Critical illness myopathy
  • Gastrointestinal disorders
  • Ion transport regulation in health and disease
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Renal function in health and disease
  • Sepsis
  • Tumor growth

Madelyn Jones

“I began my research journey at Wright State by doing neuroscience research—and I still do. I ended up falling in love with neuroscience. I have begun research in cell biology and physics and have deepened my research in neuroscience. My professors have been wonderful mentors and assisted in making my final decision to pursue a graduate degree in neuroscience. I would tell (prospective students) that their past does not matter and that the main focus should be on their future and reaching their goals. Sometimes there may be obstacles that make it harder to reach the end goal, but if one keeps pushing toward their ultimate goal, they will eventually reach it.”

Ryan Rakoczy

Ryan Rakoczy hopes to develop better treatments for prematurely born infants and others with breathing ailments. Rakoczy learned during one of his classes how breathing is controlled by tiny carotid body organs that detect oxygen in the blood. He became interested in the National Institutes of Health–funded topic. His thesis centers on leptin, the “satiety hormone.”

Department News

Wright State neuroscience major Adrian Williams appointed to state higher education committee

Adrian Williams, vice president of the Wright State student body, is one of two students serving on the Ohio Undergraduate Mission Study Committee.

Paralysis analysis

Wright State researchers Mark Rich and Andrew Voss awarded $2.7 million in federal grant money to study muscle disease
Mark Rich and Andrew Voss have received a five-year grant from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases with additional funding from the Muscular Dystrophy Association.

Wright State professor Dawn Wooley helping CDC write policy on containing the deadly poliovirus

Dawn Wooley, professor of neuroscience, cell biology and physiology, is co-chair of a CDC working group charged with formulating a policy on bio-containment, safety and security.

View all Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology News