Biomedical Sciences Ph.D. Program

Get Started

The interdisciplinary Biomedical Sciences, Ph.D. Program:

  • is big enough to be at the forefront of research
  • is small enough for interactions with experts in day to day work
  • has a cooperative climate for training and research
  • has an established record of timely graduations and alumni successes
  • provides competitive stipends in a vibrant region with a low cost of living

Our wide range of knowledge and expertise is focused around four Biomedical Science areas of research and training concentration: 

You will work with a group of faculty members recently recognized as the fourth-most productive in terms of research and professional activity among “small research universities” (less than 15 Ph.D. programs) nationally. Learn from experts in their fields—editors and reviewers for numerous journals and granting organizations and researchers developing the latest cutting-edge methodologies and instrumentation.

This fact isn’t just good for them; it’s also good for you! Our program is structured to give you one-on-one interaction with these experts. You will be trained to master sophisticated equipment, experimental methods, and current theory. You will personally contribute to grant proposals and author your own papers; you're not just a name at the bottom of a list.

You will work directly with the primary investigator, your mentor. You’ll be glad to know that this mentor is chosen, not by a panel or an advisor, but by you! If you already have a clear vision for your area of study when you enter the program, you are free to declare it from the beginning and choose your mentor immediately. But if you haven’t entirely settled on your area of focus, you can take up to a year to explore your interests before choosing your mentor. It’s up to you!

It is an integral part of our culture that faculty, staff, and other students maintain an “open door policy.” This means you have ready access to expertise, equipment, or advice, whether it’s inside or outside of your area of focus.

Research Spotlight

Image of Weiwen Long Ph.D.
Protein kinases are frequently mutated in human cancers, which leads to altered signaling pathways and contributes to tumor growth and progression. ERK3 is an atypical mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) containing an S-E-G activation motif rather than the conserved T-X-Y motif in conventional MAPKs such as ERK1/2

Program News

2017 Alumni Achievement Awards honor Wright State’s finest

The Alumni Association recognizes and celebrates the accomplishments of Wright State alumni each year at the event.

Commentary by Wright State researchers on Lou Gehrig’s disease featured in prestigious scientific journal

Wright State biological sciences professor invited graduate students to write a commentary with him on ALS research in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Wright State’s Dan Krane featured on “Investigation Discovery’s” three-night program, “JonBenét: An American Murder Mystery”

Dan Krane will discuss the role DNA testing played in the Ramsey case on episodes airing Sept. 13 and Sept. 14.

View all Biomedical Sciences News


Request Information