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Wright State University administrative and academic offices will be closed beginning December 24, 2014, and reopen January 2, 2015, at 8 a.m. Please enjoy the holidays with your family, as we enjoy them with ours.

Paul G. Seybold, Ph.D.

Professor of Physical Chemistry
Chemistry
219A Oelman Hall
(937) 775-2407
paul.seybold@wright.edu

Academic Background:

  • B. Engineering Physics with distinction - Cornell University (1960).
  • Ph.D., Biophysics - Harvard University (1968).  Thesis:  "Radiationless Transitions and Fluorescence Yields."  Directed by Professor Martin Gouterman (Chemistry Department, Harvard University).
  • Postdoctoral - Quantum Chemistry Group, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden (1967-1969), with Professor Per-Olov Löwden (Uppsala) and Professor Inga Fischer-Hjalmars (Theoretical Physics Institute, Stockholm).
  • Postdoctoral - Biochemistry Division, University of Illinois, Urbana (1969-1970), with Professor Gregorio Weber.

Present Position:

  • Professor - Departments of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio  (1980-Present), Chair of the Chemistry Department (1999-2004).
  • Other Positions:  Visiting Scientist, Monell Chemical Senses Center, University of Pennsylvania (Spring, 1973); Visiting Professor, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Stockholm University (1978-79); Visiting Scientist, Chemistry Department, University of Washington (Summer, 1981); Visiting Scholar, Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida (Winter, 1986); Visiting Scholar, Chemistry Department, University of California at San Diego (1986-87); Visiting Fellow, Center for the Study of Biological Complexity, Virginia Commonwealth University (Fall, 2004), Visiting Scholar, Chemistry Department, University of California, San Diego (Winter, 2005).; External Fellow, , Center for the Study of Biological Complexity, Virginia Commonwealth University (2004-present)
Research: 

Developing probabilistic stochastic cellular automata models that simulate the evolution of a variety of complex physical and chemical systems, using computer-based methods to find relationships between the structures of molecules and their physical, chemical, and biological properties.