Pre-Health Program

Frequently Asked Questions

  • When should I apply to pharmacy school?

    Application deadlines to pharmacy schools vary and it is important for the applicant to be familiar with each pharmacy school they are interested in. In addition, all applicants should visit the Pre-Health Advisor for assistance. Most application deadlines for pharmacy schools will fall between October 1st and February 1st.

  • How do I go about applying to pharmacy school?

    Almost half of all pharmacy degree programs in the U.S. participate in the Pharmacy College Application Service (PharmCAS) for admission. Using PharmCAS, applicants complete a single application and submit one set of official transcripts (from each college/university attended) and references to apply to multiple PharmD programs. Many pharmacy schools will also require the applicant to send a supplemental application and fee directly to the institution. Sometimes these deadlines are the same as the PharmCAS deadlines, but usually they are due at a later date. Students must complete all PharmCAS and supplemental requirements before their application will be processed and review. Visit the PharmCAS website or see the Pre-Health Advisor for more information.

  • What is an acceptable PCAT score?

    Each pharmacy school is different and enrollment statistics from previous years can generally be found on the programs website. The Pharmacy School Admissions Guide or the Pre-Health Advisor can always be used for assistance and guidance. Applicants are encouraged to be familiar with the format and the subject content of the test before sitting for the test.

  • Are sample tests or study materials available for the PCAT?

    Students also purchase study materials and/or courses to help prepare for the PCAT. Please see the Pre-Health Advisor for literature regarding these materials and courses. It is important to remember that to do well on the PCAT, a considerable amount of time (several weeks to months) should be reserved for studying material on a daily basis.

    Visit the PCAT website for more information.

  • How many letters of evaluation are required for pharmacy school?

    Schools may require applicants to submit 1-3 letters of recommendation from particular individuals (e.g., pharmacist, professor, advisor). Some pharmacy schools require health professions advisors and evaluators to use a school-specific evaluation. Letters of evaluation are submitted electronically through PharmCAS or mailed directly to the application system or school. School-specific information can be found at www.pharmcas.org/docs/ReqTypebySchool.pdf

  • What is the pharmacy school interview like?

    Only applicants that are seriously being considered for matriculation are generally invited for an interview. Applicants with direct exposure or extensive research in pharmacy will be better prepared to respond to questions. Applicants will be rated on communications skills, professionalism, knowledge of the profession, critical thinking skills, and motivation to pursue a career in pharmacy.

    For assistance in preparing for the interviewing process, please contact the Pre-Health Advisor or the Career Services office to schedule a mock interview.

  • What types of extracurricular activities and work experience should I have in order to be a competitive applicant?
    • Community service that demonstrates a commitment to helping others and/or increasing awareness of health issues
    • Activities that demonstrate your organizational and leadership skills and professional disposition and potential
    • Volunteer or paid experience working with patients in a pharmacy or health-related profession is strongly recommended.

    "Quality and persistence are far more important than quantity"

  • When will I find out if I am accepted into pharmacy school?

    Pharmacy schools are different when it comes to notifying an applicant of acceptance. It is best to visit the individual program's website, refer to the Pharmacy School Admissions Requirements guide, or visit the Pre-Health Advisor.

  • Are there any joint degree programs provided with pharmacy?

    Some individuals want to pursue an additional degree on top of their PharmD. Some examples of additional degrees are:

    • PharmD/DVM: careers working with animals and drug therapy/medications
    • PharmD/PhD: careers in academics or pharmaceutical research
    • PharmD/MBA: careers in pharmacy administration
    • PharmD/MPH: careers in public health (bioterrorism, antibiotic resistance)
  • When should I apply to optometry school?

    Early applications are desirable, and deadlines range from December to April 1 for the various schools and colleges of optometry. Contact the school or college of your choice to obtain application instructions and forms. Most optometry schools and colleges require applicants to complete an application, write a personal essay, submit transcripts from colleges attended by the applicant, take the optometry admissions test (OAT) and submit scores, provide letters of recommendation, participate in a personal interview, and demonstrate experience or exposure to the filed of optometry.

  • What is an acceptable OAT score?

    Each optometry school is different. For a complete list of the 17 schools and colleges of optometry, visit www.opted.org. Applicants are encouraged to be familiar with the format and the subject content of the test before sitting for the test.

  • What is the best way to prepare for the OAT?

    A sample test is available at the following website: www.opted.org/info_oat.cfm

    Students can also purchase study materials and/or courses to help prepare for the OAT. Please see the Pre-Health Advisor for literature regarding these materials and courses. It is important to remember that to do well on the OAT, a considerable amount of time (several weeks to months) should be reserved for studying material on a daily basis.

    Courses helpful in preparation for the OAT include: one year of biology/zoology, one year of general college chemistry, one year of organic chemistry, and one year of college physics. The tests are comprised exclusively of multiple-choice test items presented in the English language.

  • How many letters of evaluation are required for optometry school?

    There are different guidelines for each school. Optometry schools usually want to see letters from science professors, optometrists, employees, or individuals who can provide a "character reference". Regardless of the number and kind of evaluations required, it is the student's responsibility to check to see not only that the letters are written, but also that they have been received and filed with their application. The Pre-Health Advisor can also assist the student in getting their letters of evaluation prepared.

  • What is the optometry school interview like?

    Most optometry schools interview their prospective students. A student should be prepared to talk about themselves and to have knowledge of the field of optometry. Also helpful is information regarding the school where a student is interviewing, including particular strengths, special programs in teaching, and other innovative programs for the students.

    For assistance in preparing for the interviewing process, please contact the Pre-Health Advisor or the Career Services office to schedule a mock interview.

  • What types of extracurricular activities and work experience should I have in order to be a competitive applicant?

    Activities that demonstrate leadership, service, commitment, responsibility, and the ability to interact effectively with others are among the qualities evaluated by admission committee representatives. Examples include community service, campus involvement, and participation in research, outside jobs, as well as interests and hobbies. Experience in an optometric setting is also strongly recommended.

    "Quality and persistence are far more important than quantity"

  • Does Wright State have a pre-optometry student organization?

    No. Currently there isn't a student organization specifically geared toward pre-optometry students. However, pre-optometry students join the premedical society. This organization will provide mentoring, educational speakers, volunteer and community service, and social activities. If you are interested in joining, please contact the Pre-Health Advisor.

  • When should I apply to dental school?

    Applications to dental school become available in mid-May for the next entering class. Each dental school has its own application deadlines, which range from September 1 to February 1. Applicants are strongly encouraged to apply early. Dental schools begin receiving applications in June, and generally begin interviews in August and September.

  • How do I go about applying to dental school?

    All students interested in applying to dental school must submit a centralized application through the Associated American Dental Schools Application Service (AADSAS). Applicants submit a primary application through AADSAS; transcripts are verified, grade point averages are calculated, and AADSAS sends a standard application packet to each of the dental schools designated by the applicant. Few dental schools do not participate in AADSAS and if a student is applying to one of these schools, they must send their applications directly to the individual dental school.

    AADSAS applications can take up to 4-8 weeks to process. Many dental schools also have supplemental applications and fees that must be submitted to consider the application complete. Applicants can view the Official Guide to Dental Schools resource book to be familiar with the dental schools. Applicants are encouraged to apply to more than one dental school.

  • What is an acceptable DAT score?

    Each dental school is different. The Official Guide to Dental Schools lists competitive DAT and GPAs for a particular school. Applicants are encouraged to be familiar with the format and the subject content of the test before sitting for the test.

  • Are sample tests available?

    A sample test is available at the ADA website.

    Students can also purchase study materials and/or courses to help prepare for the DAT. Please see the Pre-Health Advisor for literature regarding these materials and courses. It is important to remember that to do well on the DAT, a considerable amount of time (several weeks to months) should be reserved for studying material on a daily basis.

  • How many letters of evaluation are required for dental school?

    Most dental schools required 3-4 letters of evaluation or recommendation. At Wright State University, there are two methods for compiling and submitting letters of evaluation: (1) a composite letter submitted by the health professions advising office, and (2) individual letters of evaluation sent to the application service (or directly to the dental schools). A composite letter consists of a collection of individual letters of evaluation that are collected by the health professions advising office and supplied to the application service under a cover letter from the Pre-Health Advisor.

    Dental schools prefer at least 3 faculty evaluation letters, with two from science faculty. A letter of support from a dentist is strongly recommended.

  • What is the dental school interview like?

    Only applicants that are seriously being considered for matriculation are generally invited for an interview. Applicants will be expected to discuss their motivation for dentistry, their personal and professional goals, and their assessment of current oral health issues. Interviewing formats vary and can either be one-on-one or in a small group. Applicants are usually provided with information about the school's interviewing process before the interview. Most students will be taken on school tours, meet with current students, and discuss financial costs with an advisor.

    For assistance in preparing for the interviewing process, please contact the Pre-Health Advisor or the Career Services office to schedule a mock interview.

  • What types of extracurricular activities and work experience should I have in order to be a competitive applicant?
    • Community service that demonstrates a commitment to helping others and/or increasing awareness of oral health issues
    • Leadership positions, such as in student organizations, charity organizations, fundraiser activities, etc.
    • Activities that demonstrate your ability to manage multiple tasks while performing well academically
    • Shadowing hours with a general dentist

    "Quality and persistence are far more important than quantity"

  • When will I find out if I am accepted into dental school?

    Dental schools begin sending offers of acceptance starting December 1st. Depending on when an applicant receives their acceptance, they have between 15 and 45 days to respond. Most dental schools will require a tuition deposit to hold a position in a class.

    Many dental schools develop a wait list or alternate list. On May 1, dental schools report to AADSAS the names of their confirmed acceptances and AADSAS provides each school with the names of those applicants who hold positions at more than one school. Dental schools may contact such individuals and may rescind an offer of admission if there is no resolution after 15 days.

  • Are there any joint degree programs provided with dentistry?

    Yes, some programs will offer a joint Master's (e.g., Public Health, Business Administration) or Doctoral (Ph.D.). For more information on these degree programs, you can review the Official Guide to Dental Schools or see the Pre-Health Advisor.

  • Does Wright State have a pre-dental student organization?

    The University is currently forming a student organization for pre-dental students. This organization will provide mentoring, educational speakers, volunteer and community service, and social activities. If you are interested in joining, please contact the Pre-Health Advisor.

  • What is the difference between an M.D. and a D.O.?

    There are two types of physicians in the United States, Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) and Doctors of Allopathic Medicine (M.D.).

    There are similarities between an M.D. and a D.O. They include:

    • Both require a bachelor's degree for admission
    • Both require an emphasis on sciences and share the same entrance requirements
    • Both are four-year medical schools
    • Both can compete for all the same residencies (M.D. or D.O. residencies)
    • Both can practice all fields of medicine (surgery, family care, OB/GYN, etc.)
    • Both must pass comparable state licensing exams
    • Both practice in fully accredited and licensed health care facilities

    A D.O. differs by:

    • Osteopaths stress preventive medicine and use the musculoskeletal system as a key element of health
    • They are the original professionals to pioneer the concept of "wellness" and health lifestyle habits
    • The majority of osteopathic physicians (65%) become primary care physicians (pediatrics, family practice, internal medicine, and OB/GYN)
    • They have a higher percentage of graduates who practice in the much-needed field of rural medicine, or in underserved areas
    • Osteopathic physicians feel they have an additional tool in treating their patients: osteopathic manipulative treatment (or OMT), which is part of a holistic approach to medicine.
  • When should I apply to medical school?

    Follow the Pre-Med Checklist and sample undergraduate programs to prepare yourself in a timely way throughout your undergraduate years. Study the websites of interest and movies and authors to add to your knowledge of the application process and options. Ideally, the MCAT is taken in the spring your junior year, you apply to medical school in the summer between your junior and senior years, and have medical school interviews during your senior year. Contact your academic advisor and the Pre-Health advisor on a regular basis.

  • How do I go about applying to medical school?

    Instead of filling out an application for each medical school you are interested in attending, you fill out only one application which goes to a central agency. These agencies, AMCAS (American Medical Colleges Application Service) and AACOMAS (Association of American Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service) process applications through the World Wide Web. When you submit your completed application to AMCAS or AACOMAS, you will designate which schools are to receive your application.

    AMCAS and AACOMAS then check your application against your transcripts (which you also have submitted to them from all the undergraduate institutions you attended), verify the information and the grades are correct, attach your MCAT scores, and send your application to the schools you choose. Each of those medical schools then sends you a secondary application that is specific to that particular medical school. After you return the completed secondary application, that medical school will start to evaluate your complete package (application, GPA, MCAT scores, letters of recommendation, etc.)

    Once your secondary applications have been submitted, you need to contact the Pre-Health Advisor and request that your letters of recommendation be sent. This evaluation process can take until March or April. If they decide to grant you an interview, you will generally receive a letter any time before March 1, asking for you to select a time for an interview. If you have not heard from any medical school by March 1, chances are you will not get into medical school that year. Medical schools routinely conduct interviews from September through March or April.

  • Are there any workshops or classes I can take to help me understand the application process better?

    Yes. Annually, the Pre-Health Advisor offers evening workshops in the month of May. These workshops are geared towards those students who are planning on applying to medical school that summer. The workshops will provide detailed information on the application process, writing personal statements, collecting letters of recommendation, and important deadlines that must be met. Detailed information regarding these workshops are sent out through the prehealth listserv. If you are interested in participating, please contact the Pre-Health Advising office at (937) 775-4226.

  • How can I find out what my chances are of getting into out-of-state medical schools?

    The Association of American Medical Schools (AAMC) publishes a book annually called Medical School Admission Requirements (MSAR). It gives facts on applications, interviews, and acceptances to every medical school in the United States and Canada. The newest version of the MSAR is available on CD-ROM. In addition, AACOM lists requirements needed for every U.S. osteopathic medical college in The Osteopathic Medical College Information Booklet (CIB).

    It is always best to look at the specific requirements of the school you hope to attend to make sure you have fulfilled all of their prerequisites. This information is available through the Pre-Health Advisor's office or in the reference section of the Fordham Health Sciences Library at Wright State. The books are also for sale in the university bookstore, or online at www.aamc.org and www.aacom.org.

  • What is the MCAT? What is an acceptable MCAT score?

    Just as the ACT and the SAT are tools used by undergraduate institutions to help them decide on an applicant's suitability for undergraduate admissions, the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) is a tool used by the medical schools to judge an applicant's preparation and suitability for medical school coursework. It is also used to predict the applicant's ability to pass medical boards.

    The MCAT is delivered exclusively at computer-based testing sites and is offered approximately 24 times per year. Additional information about the MCAT can be found at www.aamc.org/students/mcat/cbt.htm. The MCAT exam is an arduous 5 ½ hour exam taken 12 to 18 months before starting medical school. Traditionally, a student takes the exam in spring/early summer of his or her junior year.

    The final score is reported as a composite number score (total from first three sections plus a letter for the writing section). The highest possible score is 45-T. The average score for all applicants in 2006 was 27.4; however, the average score for matriculants was 30.2. Osteopathic medical colleges don't put as much emphasis on the MCAT score as they do the entire application; therefore, average MCAT scores for matriculants to D.O. schools are often lower (usually around 25-26).

  • Are sample tests available?

    A sample test is available at the AAMC website: www.aamc.org/students/mcat. A free MCAT practice test can also be found at www.e-mcat.com.

    Students can also purchase study materials and/or courses to help prepare for the MCAT. Please see the Pre-Health Advisor for literature regarding these materials and courses. It is important to remember that to do well on the MCAT, a considerable amount of time (several weeks to months) should be reserved for studying material on a daily basis.

  • Is the ACT score a good predictor of how a student will perform on the MCAT?

    Yes, the scores on both tests are generally within 1 to 2 points of each other. If you receive a 24 on the ACT, you will probably receive a similar score on the MCAT, so high school students should take the ACT seriously and post the highest score they can as a predictor of their ability to get into medical school. Some schools, such as Wright State University School of Medicine, have started Early Assurance Programs (EAP) based on accepting a small number of applicants at the end of their sophomore year of college, using their ACT scores as one criterion (ACT score of 28 or above is necessary) for consideration The EAP then give students a conditional acceptance based upon:

    • Finishing their bachelor's degree before they start medical school
    • Experience in the medical field through work or volunteering at hospitals, nursing homes, or medical facilities
    • Involvement in extracurricular activities
    • Involvement in community volunteer activities
    • Letters of evaluation from professors
    • Personal qualities including outgoing personality, leadership skills, team skills, intellectual curiosity, compassion, empathy, and others.
  • What is the Early Decision Program/Plan (EDP)?

    The Early Decision Program/Plan is a program at many medical schools that allows an applicant to send their materials to only one school well before the usual deadline and to receive a decision from that school promptly (by October 1st). If accepted, you agree not to apply to any other medical school; if you are denied or wait-listed, you are eligible to apply to other schools. Students should only make an EDP application to the school they would be thrilled to attend.

  • Do I really have to take calculus and biochemistry?

    No. There are only a handful of medical schools that require calculus and/or biochemistry for admission, most of those schools being in the eastern or western part of the United States. If you are particularly anxious to get into one of those schools (Stanford, Johns Hopkins, etc.), meet with the Pre-Health Advisor who can show you the individual requirements of that school to make sure you plan your undergraduate courses accordingly. While the overwhelming majority of medical schools do not require these courses, most medical schools notice if you have taken them.

    Performance in biochemistry is a strong predictor of success in medical school, so doing well in biochemistry helps your application. Calculus (required for both the chemistry and biomedical engineering pre-med degrees) is another course that medical schools like to see. Therefore, the best advice is: if you can take these courses and perform well in them, do so. If you do not have time to take these courses, don't worry about it. Doing poorly in biochemistry and calculus (less than a B) is worse than not taking them at all.

  • How many letters of evaluation are required for medical school?

    Most medical schools required a minimum of 3 letters of evaluation or recommendation. At Wright State University, a composite letter written by the Pre-Health Advisor is attached to the individual letters of evaluation and sent electronically as a single file through Virtual Evaluations. A composite letter consists of individual letters of evaluation (maximum of 5 total) that are collected by the health professions advising office and supplied to the application service under a cover letter from the Pre-Health Advisor.

    Medical schools require at least 2 science faculty evaluation letters. Other letters can be from other faculty members, research investigators, practicing physicians or health care professionals, or employers.

  • What is the medical school interview like?

    Only applicants that are seriously being considered for matriculation are generally invited for an interview. Applicants will be expected to discuss their motivation for medicine, their personal and professional goals, and their assessment of current health issues. Interviewing formats vary and can either be one-on-one or in a small group. Applicants are usually provided with information about the school's interviewing process before the interview. Most students will be taken on school tours, meet with current students, and discuss financial costs with an advisor.

    For assistance in preparing for the interviewing process, please contact the Pre-Health Advisor or the Career Services office to schedule a mock interview.

  • What types of extracurricular activities and work experience should I have in order to be a competitive applicant?
    • Community service that demonstrates a commitment to helping others and/or increasing awareness of oral health issues
    • Leadership positions, such as in student organizations, charity organizations, fundraiser activities, etc.
    • Activities that demonstrate your ability to manage multiple tasks while performing well academically
    • Shadowing hours with a general practicing physician

    "Quality and persistence are far more important than quantity"

  • When will I find out if I am accepted into medical school?

    Medical schools agree not to inform candidates of acceptance prior to October 15, except for EDP applicants who will be informed by October 1. By March 30, each school is expected to have issued a number of acceptances equal to the number of places in the first year class. Prior to May 15, accepted applicants have at least two weeks to respond to an offer of acceptance and can hold acceptance offers from any other schools without penalty. After May 15, medicals schools may implement school-specific procedures for accepted applicants, which might include a shorter response time (less than 2 weeks), a statement of intent, and/or a deposit. For a complete set of guidelines, a student can view the "AAMC Recommendations for Medical School Admission Officers" at www.aamc.org.

    Medical schools will send a letter of acceptance to an applicant notifying them of the amount of time they have to respond to their offer. They expect the response to be made in writing, whether accepting or declining, within the time period they designate.

    Many applicants will receive multiple offers. The suggested procedure is as follows: (1) rank the schools you have applied to in order of preference, (2) once an offer has been received, send a letter of withdrawal to all schools on your list that fall below the school to which you have been accepted, (3) as you receive each new acceptance, either accept it or reject it on the basis of how the school ranks on your list. Applicants are eligible to accept multiple offers; however, when an applicant receives an acceptance from their first-choice school, they should withdraw from all other schools so that they hold no more than one medical school place at one time.

  • What percentage of Wright State students are accepted to medical school?

    One hundred percent of our applicants might be accepted if they..

    • Had high grades
    • Had high MCAT scores
    • Applied to a reasonable mix of medical schools in Ohio and maybe a few in other states
    • Applied in a timely fashion
    • Had good recommendations and sufficient extracurricular experience

    When applicants do not meet all these standards then the percentage of acceptance falls. For this reason, some undergraduate institutions do not calculate percentages at all. Others use formulas that exclude certain applicants, such as those who do not score the national average on the MCAT or have grades below the national average GPA. Selective undergraduate general enrollment policies, such as at private institutions, may also raise their percentage of applicants who actually matriculate into medical school.

    At Wright State we don't inflate the med school acceptance percentage. We don't exclude anyone who has not met the standards above. We look at all the applicants in a give year - whether they are our traditional undergraduates, people changing careers who are enrolled in Wright State premed courses, graduate students, or students who returned to Wright State after many years away from school.

    Altogether, roughly half of the applicants from Wright State get into medical school. Between 10 to 15 percent of the Wright State University School of Medicine is made up of Wright State undergraduates each year.

  • Are there any joint degree programs provided with medicine?

    Yes, some programs will offer a joint Master's (e.g., Public Health, Business Administration) or Doctoral (Ph.D., J.D.). For more information on these degree programs, you can review the MSAR publication or see the Pre-Health Advisor.

  • Does Wright State have a pre-med student organization?

    Yes, the University has a well-developed premedical society that includes undergraduates interested in a variety of health professions. This organization provides mentoring, educational speakers, volunteer and community service, and social activities. If you are interested in joining, please contact the Pre-Health Advisor.

  • When should I apply to physical therapy school?

    Although each school has its own application deadline, students interested in applying to physical therapy programs should complete their applications between September and early December, approximately one year before they hope to matriculate. For additional information on programs and their deadlines, visit the Directory of Physical Therapy Programs website at www.apta.org or contact the Pre-Health Advisor.

  • How do I decide on a physical therapy program to attend?

    Students should explore and research a number of physical therapy programs. Deciding what program is best for you is a personal one made after evaluating factors such as geographic location and size of school, cost, class size, licensure pass rates, employability, design and length of program, and degree awarded. Students are encouraged to contact current physical therapy students, as well as recent graduates, to gain information about the variety of factors a program a school has to offer. Viewing a school's website page can also be very helpful.

  • What undergraduate degree should I obtain to gain admission to a physical therapy program?

    There isn't one specific degree that a student must follow to be eligible to apply to physical therapy programs. However, it is important to satisfactorily complete the required prerequisite courses for each school as part of the undergraduate degree curriculum. For assistance, the student can meet with the Pre-Health Advisor to ensure the proper courses are completed and the times they are offered.

  • What is an acceptable GRE score?

    Each physical therapy school is different and students should research each school's website for statistical data. Applicants are encouraged to be familiar with the format and the subject content of the GRE before sitting for the test. If a student doesn't perform well on the GRE, they are eligible to sit for the exam again when they are ready.

  • Are sample tests available?

    Students can purchase study materials and/or courses to help prepare for the GRE. Please see the Pre-Health Advisor for literature regarding these materials and courses. It is important to remember that to do well on the GRE, a considerable amount of time (several weeks to months) should be reserved for studying material on a daily basis.

    For information on when and where you can take the GRE, visit the website www.ets.org or call 1-800-473-2255.

  • How many letters of evaluation are required for physical therapy school?

    Generally, most physical therapy programs will require at least 3 letters of recommendation. It is important for a student to be familiar with each programs requirement, as some will require letters from physical therapists, science professors, and employers.

  • What is the physical therapy school interview like?

    Not all physical therapy schools interview their applicants. Generally, those schools that do, only invite applicants that are seriously being considered for matriculation. Applicants will be expected to discuss their motivation for physical therapy, their personal and professional goals, and their assessment of current health care issues. Interviewing formats vary and can either be one-on-one or in a small group. Applicants are usually provided with information about the school's interviewing process before the interview. Most students will be taken on school tours, meet with current students, and discuss financial costs with an advisor.

    For assistance in preparing for the interviewing process, please contact the Pre-Health Advisor or the Career Services office to schedule a mock interview.

  • What can students do to enhance their chances of admission to a physical therapy program?

    Candidates should have a high overall GPA and a high GPA in prerequisite course work. Admission officers also look favorably on an applicant's volunteer experience as a physical therapy aide, letters of recommendation from physical therapists or science professors, a sincere commitment to the profession, and excellent writing and interpersonal skills. Students should get involved in:

    • Leadership and teamwork positions, such as in student organizations, charity organizations, fundraiser activities, etc.
    • Activities that demonstrate your ability to manage multiple tasks while performing well academically
    • Shadowing hours with a physical therapist

    "Quality and persistence are far more important than quantity"

  • When will I find out if I am accepted into physical therapy school?

    Physical therapy schools usually begin notifying students of acceptance in January.

  • What is the difference between a physical therapist and a physical therapist assistant? Is the physical therapist assistant program a stepping-stone to a physical therapist program?

    A physical therapist requires graduate level work (either a master's or doctoral degree) and successful completion of a national exam. A physical therapist assistant is generally completion of college level courses within two years (associates degree). A physical therapist assistant will assist the physical therapist in carrying out treatments on a patient.

    The physical therapist assistant curriculum differs from that of the physical therapist and does not provide the needed prerequisites required for physical therapist education.

  • Does Wright State have a pre-physical therapy student organization?

    Currently, the University does not have a student organization targeted specifically to pre-physical therapy students. However, many of our exercise science/pre-PT students are members of either the Biology Club or the PreMedical Society. These organizations provide mentoring, educational speakers, volunteer and community service, and social activities. If you are interested in joining either of these organizations, please contact the Pre-Health Advisor.

  • When should I apply to physician assistant programs?

    Many PA programs (over 70%) require applicants to apply through the Central Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA). Applications submitted through CASPA must be submitted no later than October 1 (some schools allow November 1st for their application deadline) of the preceding year. If you are applying to a school that does not use the CASPA application service, it is important that you become familiar with the application process and deadlines for that school. For more information or assistance, please see the Pre-Health Advisor.

  • How do I go about applying to physician assistant programs?

    It is important to be familiar with each individual PA program's admission process. Most schools will require an application be completed through CASPA which can be found online at www.caspaonline.org

  • Do you have to take the GRE?

    Some PA programs, but not all, require an applicant to submit a GRE score. For information on when and where you can take the GRE, visit the website www.ets.org or call 1-800-473-2255.

  • How many letters of evaluation are required for physician assistant programs?

    Most schools require 2 letters of recommendation for each applicant; however, programs may differ and it is important for a student to be familiar with the program requirements they wish to apply to. Letters of recommendation can be from professors, health care supervisors/employers, pre-health advisors, or other individuals that can evaluate the overall character of an applicant (letters from friends and family members are not allowed). Letters can be directly attached to the CASPA application or sent directly to the school.

  • Is an applicant interviewed?

    Many schools will invite competitive applicants for an interview and facility tour. It is during the interview that the admissions committee gains an understanding of an applicants overall character and interpersonal skills. For assistance in interviewing, contact Career Services or see the Pre-Health Advisor.

  • What types of extracurricular activities and work experience should I have in order to be a competitive applicant?
    • Extracurricular activities that can demonstrate your ability to work in a team setting, such as athletics, charity organizations, student volunteer groups, etc.
    • Significant exposure in health-related settings, such as an EMT, nurse's aid, nurse, x-ray technician, or respiratory therapist.
  • When will I find out if I am accepted into a physician assistant program?

    Often, competitive applicants are invited for an interview and asked to complete a supplementary application. After the interview is complete, the admissions committee reviews the list of applicants and will either make an acceptance offer (by phone or through written communication), place the applicant on a waiting list, or deny the applicant admission. Some schools accept using a "rolling admission" procedure, while others wait until all applicants are reviewed before offering any acceptances.

  • Does Wright State have a student organization for students interested in a career as a physician assistant?

    Students interested in pursuing a career as a physician assistant should join the Wright State Premedical Society. This organization will provide mentoring, educational speakers, volunteer and community service, and social activities. Students should also participate in Pre-Health Seminars and activities throughout the year. If you are interested in getting involved, please contact the Premedical Society President or the Pre-Health Advisor.

  • When should I apply to vet school?

    Students interested in attending vet school immediately after college should begin preparing their application materials during the spring of their junior year. Applications aren't normally available until early in the summer, but students can begin requesting letters of recommendations, drafting personal statements and submitting transcript requests in the spring. Completed applications should be submitted in the fall semester of their senior year (most deadlines are October 1st). Because vet schools do not require the completion of an undergraduate degree, very well-qualified students may submit their applications in the fall of their second or third year. However, it's important to remember that a very small percentage of students who don't complete an undergraduate degree are accepted into vet school.

  • How do I go about applying to veterinary school?

    Most veterinary schools require that applications be processed through the Veterinary Medical College Application Service (VMCAS). The application is web-based and is completed by the applicant only once. Once submitted, the completed application is processed and sent to each school the student wishes to apply. The VMCAS becomes available each year in late May/early June and can be found at www.aavmc.org

    Two additional, and very important, components of the application are the personal statement and letters of evaluation. The personal statement should be written in a way that demonstrates who the applicant really is; their unique attributes and aspirations. It also gives the committee members an idea of the applicant's communication skills and writing ability. Applicants should address such things as career goals and objectives, their understanding of veterinary medicine, and why this is the right career field for them. The VMCAS application also requires that letters of recommendation be submitted through its Electronic Letters of Recommendation system (eLOR). Every school that receives a student's application will also receive the same letters of recommendation.

    Not all veterinary schools use VMCAS as their application processing system and require students to submit individual applications to their schools. Contact the Pre-Health Advisor or admission representatives if you have any questions about the application process.

  • What is an acceptable GRE or MCAT score?

    At the Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine, students need to post a minimum GRE score of 955 (total for all subsets) or MCAT score of 24. Competitive GRE scores generally average near 1190.

  • Where can I find more information about the GRE or MCAT?

    For information on when and where you can take the GRE, visit the website www.ets.org or call 1-800-473-2255. Information about the MCAT can be found at www.aamc.org

  • How many letters of evaluation are required for vet school?

    The VMCAS application requires that you enter the names for three evaluators. Generally, veterinary schools like to see a letter from a practicing veterinarian and at least one science professor. Other letters can come from research professors, internship supervisors, pre-health advisors, employers, etc.

  • What is the veterinary school interview like?

    Not all veterinary schools require an interview. Those that do, generally only invite applicants that are seriously being considered for matriculation. Applicants will be expected to discuss their motivation for veterinary medicine, their personal and professional goals, and their assessment of current animal health issues. Interviewing formats vary and can either be one-on-one or in a small group. Applicants are usually provided with information about the school's interviewing process before the interview. Most students will be taken on school tours, meet with current students, and discuss financial costs with an advisor.

    For assistance in preparing for the interviewing process, please contact the Pre-Health Advisor or the Career Services office to schedule a mock interview.

  • What types of extracurricular activities and work experience should I have in order to be a competitive applicant?
    • Community service that demonstrates a commitment to helping animals and/or increasing awareness of animal health issues
    • Leadership positions, such as in student organizations, charity organizations, fundraiser activities, etc.
    • Activities that demonstrate your ability to manage multiple tasks while performing well academically
    • Shadowing hours with a practicing veterinarian or assisting at a shelter, grooming facility or zoo

    "Quality and persistence are far more important than quantity"

  • When will I find out if I am accepted into vet school?

    Veterinary schools generally hold interviews between the months of November through March and may begin sending offers of acceptance as early as December 1st. Most veterinary schools will require a tuition deposit to hold a position in a class.

  • Are there any joint degree programs provided with veterinary medicine?

    Yes, some programs will offer a joint Master's (e.g., Public Health, Business Administration) or Doctoral (Ph.D.). For more information on these degree programs, you can see the Pre-Health Advisor or speak with an admission representative.

  • Does Wright State have a pre-vet student organization?

    Yes! The University has a student organization for pre-vet students that provides mentoring, educational speakers, volunteer and community service, and social activities. If you are interested in joining, please contact the President of the pre-vet society, the pre-vet peer mentor, or the Pre-Health Advisor.

  • How do I know that a career in health care is for me and how do I choose which one?

    Many students choose to pursue health care because they enjoy working with people and learning about the human body. When trying to decide what career within health care to pursue, the following suggestions should be considered:

    • Explore: Do what you can to learn about the different health professions that are available. Attend workshops or seminars, research careers on the internet or shadow someone in the profession. "The more you know the better off you'll be.
    • Determine what type of personality you have: Do you like to work with people and how much? Are you a team player? Do you work calm under pressure? Are you comfortable working with all types of individuals (young, old, disabled, dying, etc.)? What lifestyle do you envision?
    • Do you have a love for learning? How well do you perform in the sciences? Are you willing to continue studying throughout your career?

     

  • When should I meet with the Pre-Health Advisor?

    The Pre-Health Advisor is available to meet with students by appointments only. High school students (and their parents) are strongly encouraged to attend the President's Day Path to Health Professions event, or meet with the Pre-Health Advisor during Raider Open House. Appointments are also welcomed.

    Once in college, it is recommended that freshman undergraduate students enroll in one of the pre-health learning communities (UVC 1010, UH 1010), in the fall and continue exploring the different health careers and pre-requisites needed. During a student's sophomore year, they are recommended to begin making one-on-one appointments with the advisor to review their progress and begin preparing for the following year. Junior year students should meet with the Pre-Health Advisor once per semester and attend the application workshops held during spring semester.

    To schedule an appointment with the advisor, please call (937) 775-3180.

  • What can high school students do to prepare for a career in health care?
    • Get a head start on exploring different health careers and decide whether or not you enjoy the day-to-day responsibilities (consider volunteering or working in a health care setting)
    • Develop an educational foundation that will prepare you well for college. Enroll in a college preparatory curriculum that includes physical and life sciences, preferably advanced courses if available. Students should take the following courses in high school: Mathematics (through pre-calculus), one year of Biology, one year of Chemistry, and one year of Physics.
    • Take the ACT/SAT test seriously!
  • Should a high school student take Advanced Placement (AP) courses?

    A student should always consider the opportunity to explore challenging material; however, it's important to remember that not all health profession schools will accept AP credit as fulfilling pre-requisites. Students always have the option of declining AP credits and taking the course in college.

  • What major should I choose?

    Students should always pick a major based on an honest assessment of their interests and talents; one that they will enjoy, perform well in, and can provide them an alternate career to health care. While most students interested in health professions major in biological sciences, this is not required. What is important is that the student demonstrates the ability to read, write, think critically and perform well in all the required sciences/pre-requisites.

  • Who will be my advisor at Wright State?

    Undergraduate students interested in the health professions can seek guidance and advice from the Pre-Health advisor. In addition, each student has an academic advisor specific for their degree. If a student is also participating in the Honors Program, they would also have an Honors advisor assigned to them. It's important for students to remain in contact with their advisors throughout their undergraduate years.

  • What can I do to prepare for the required standardized test (e.g. MCAT, DAT, GRE)?
    • Become familiar with the material to be tested. Never take the test before you complete the courses and topics you could be tested on.
    • Take the practice tests to get an idea of the timing and format of the exam.
    • Enroll in a preparatory course or purchase review books to help you organize the material.
    • Develop study groups with fellow classmates.
  • How do I write an effective personal statement or essay?

    First make it personal. You want to tell the reader "who you really are." For example, you might choose to write about your journey toward your chosen career, or a personal experience you've been through that made you who you are today. What was your motivation for pursuing this health profession? Use your personal statement to tell your story; something the reader won't necessarily get by reviewing your application.

    Always have your statement or essay proof-read by many individuals. Don't be surprised if you write 5-10 drafts before you create a truly effective essay. Your essay should be error-free before submission!

  • Who should I ask for letters of recommendation?

    Recommendation letters required for each professional program will vary and it is important that the applicant be familiar with the requirements. Generally, an applicant should seek a minimum of 3 letters of evaluation. These letters can come from science professors (individuals who taught you in more than one course are recommended), health professionals that have mentored you in the field, employers who can describe your work ethic and personality, or even your pre-health advisor. Often (as in the case with medical schools), the pre-health advisor will write a cover letter of evaluation that will supplement your other letters. It's important that an applicant not choose a family member or friend to write a letter of evaluation.

  • How should I prepare for an interview?

    Students are encouraged to work with the Office of Career Services at Wright State to develop the skills necessary for an impressive interview. The Pre-Health Advisor as well as peer mentors are also available to provide assistance and guidance.

    If you are offered an interview, you need to be aware that interview committees are made up of all different types of people, including health professionals, professors, students, community representatives, and others.

    Aspects of Personal Effectiveness:

    • Always make appropriate eye contact
    • Arrive promptly (which is 15-30 minutes EARLY)
    • Be reliable in keeping all appointments
    • Have an appropriate handshake
    • Have an appropriate greeting
    • Be appropriately groomed and dressed
    • Be appropriate in your use of humor and smiles, and in your emotions and moods
    • Inspire confidence and trust
    • Have excellent communication skills
    • Stay on the topic asked by the interviewer (don't take control!)
    • Maintain good body language and posture
    • Don't talk too much
    • Try to be up on current events in case you are asked about them
    • Be prepared to talk about the negatives of your application
    • Have several questions ready, in advance, to ask about their program
  • Do you need an undergraduate degree to be admitted into a chiropractic school?

    Although the typical applicant has acquired nearly four years of pre-medical undergraduate college education, a degree is not always necessary.   Most chiropractic medicine programs require that applicants have at least 3 years of undergraduate education; others might require a bachelor’s degree.

  • What type of courses will I need to complete to be eligible for admission into chiropractic school?

    Courses in biology, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, psychology and related labs are often required.  It’s important to research the school/program of interest as each school has it’s own requirements.

  • What major should I pursue if I’m interested in this career?

    There isn’t a required degree program that must be followed.  However, most pre-chiropractic medicine students pursue a degree in Biological Sciences.

  • What conditions do chiropractors treat?

    According to the American Chiropractic Association (ACA), Doctors of Chiropractic (DCs) care for patients of all ages, with a variety of health conditions.  DCs are well known for their expertise with back pain, neck pain and headaches.  Their training in highly skilled manipulations or chiropractic adjustments allows them to perform hands-on treatment for their patient.  DCs often care for patients with a wide range of injuries and disorders of the musculoskeletal system.  DCs focus on the body structure and how it affects our overall function.  They counsel patients in diet, nutrition, exercise, health habits and occupational and lifestyle modification.  DCs do not prescribe drugs or perform surgical procedures, although they do refer patients for these services if they are medically necessary.

  • Do insurance plans cover chiropractic?

    Yes.  Chiropractic care is included in most health insurance plans.

  • What type of education and training do chiropractors have?

    Doctors of Chiropractic care are educated as primary-contact health care providers, with an emphasis on diagnosis and treatment of conditions related to the musculoskeletal system and the nerves that supply them.  Four to five years of professional study are the standard and include education in orthopedics, neurology, physiology, human anatomy, clinical diagnosis, imaging, exercise, nutrition and rehabilitation.  In addition, highly skilled manipulation (or adjusting techniques) is taught.

  • Are there any Chiropractic Colleges in Ohio?

    No, Ohio does not have a Chiropractic Medical College.  There are currently 21 accredited institutions in the United States and Canada affiliated with the Association of Chiropractic Colleges. 

    For a full list of member institutions: http://www.chirocolleges.org/members.html

  • What is the average salary of a Chiropractor?

    $90,000

  • What does an occupational therapist do?

    Occupational therapists (OTs) work with patients in performing activities of “daily living”.  OT services typically include customized treatment programs, comprehensive home and job site evaluations, performance skills assessments and treatment, adaptive equipment recommendations, and guidance to family members and caregivers.  OTs often work in hospitals and other health care and community settings (e.g., nursing homes, schools).  More than one-third of OTs work part-time.

  • What is the difference between an occupational therapists and an occupational therapist assistant?

    The biggest difference between these two careers is the level of education.  An occupational therapist requires post-graduate work (either at the masters or doctoral level) for entry-level practice whereas an occupational therapist requires an associates degree.

  • What should I major in at the undergraduate level if I want to apply to a graduate level Occupational Therapy program?

    Examples of what other students have majored in at the undergraduate level include psychology, liberal arts, biology, sociology and anthropology.  It’s important to remember that no matter what discipline you decide to pursue, you must make sure you have taken the necessary prerequisites for admission into the graduate programs you’re most interested in applying.

  • How do I get observation or volunteer experience?

    The best way to gain experience is by contacting local facilities (e.g., hospitals, nursing homes, schools) that employ occupational therapists.  Try looking in the yellow pages of your phone book under “Occupational Therapy” or “Rehabilitation”.  Calling facilities rather than emailing is encouraged.  Always be prepared to discuss your interest in the career and be as flexible with your time as possible.

  • I am currently working in another profession. I am considering occupational therapy as a second careers. Is this feasible?

    A number of students go back to school to pursue a “change in career” and occupational therapy is a career that many pursue.  If you already have an undergraduate degree, it might not necessary to pursue a second undergraduate degree.  It’s important to contact the individual programs to which you are interested in applying in order to determine what prerequisites you would need to take.

  • How much will I make as an occupational therapist?

    Average salary is near $55,000 per year.  For the most recent salary information, go to the U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics website.

  • What does a podiatrist do?

    Podiatrists are practitioners who are experts in the study of human movement, with the medical care of the foot and ankle as its primary focus.  Many podiatrists focus on a particular area of podiatric medicine, including surgery, sports medicine, biomechanics, geriatric care, pediatrics, orthopedics, and primary care.  With the increase number in diabetic patients, podiatrists are often the care provider responsible for lower extremity problems.

  • How do I become a podiatrist?

    In order to be awarded the degree of Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, you must complete four years of study at an accredited podiatric medical college.  Similar to other medical schools, the first two years concentrate on classroom instruction and laboratory work; the third and fourth years focus on clinical science and patient care.

  • How long is the residency (or post-graduate medical education) for podiatrists?

    After completing four years of podiatric medical training, graduates typically select a Podiatric Medicine and Surgery Residency of 24- or 36 months in duration.  Most states require that podiatrists require a minimum of one year of residency training for practice; two years for board certification.

  • Is there an admission test required?

    Yes, podiatric schools require the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) for admissions.

     

  • Are there any podiatric medical schools in Ohio?

    Yes.  The Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine is located in Independence, Ohio.  There are 8 other podiatric medical colleges:  Barry University School of Podiatric Medicine (Miami Shores, FL), California School of Podiatric Medicine at Samuel Merritt University (Oakland, CA), Des Moines University College of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery (Des Moines, IA), Midwestern University of Arizona School of Podiatric Medicine (Glendale, AZ), New York College of Podiatric Medicine (New York, NY), Dr. William M. School College of Podiatric Medicine at the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science (North Chicago, IL), Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (Philadelphia, PA), and Western University of Health Sciences College of Podiatric Medicine (Pomona, CA).